Autism – Discovering the real me two years on

20/05/2018 marks two years exactly since I received my Autism diagnosis.

Autism is a vast spectrum filled with wonderful, bright and intelligent people with big hearts and kind souls. Each with our own unique personalities. A spectrum I am proud to be part of.

Autism

I remain both overwhelmed and proud of everything I have achieved and experienced throughout this time. Moving away to University in a brand new town with entirely new people was my biggest, scariest challenge and something way out of my little comfort zone. Something I never imagined myself to manage. But another challenge in which I succeeded. I threw myself in at the deep end. Receiving a diagnosis as a 19-year-old truly was baffling, especially in a stigmatized World where the common belief is that only Children have Autism. From knowing nothing about Autism to writing my own blog post on my condition certainly is a highlight, for me. 

My diagnosis came about during Therapy for my Anorexia Nervosa. My Therapist and I worked together weekly for a very long time, until eventually we hit a brick wall and found it harder to work with each other due to my personal difficulties like understanding and expressing feelings and emotions. Attempting to express myself lead to tears and agitation, I couldn’t string together a sentence such as ‘I feel sad’ without panicking and refusing to look my Therapist in the eye. I could only refer to myself as being ‘fat and a bad person’. Additionally, maintaining eye contact is another one of my weaknesses. The inability to express myself has proven to have negative implications on my road to recovery, because I am only able to express myself confidently with words which is hard when trying to engage with services. 

Accept difference, not indifference.Each day, I work tirelessly to better myself and to beat any obstacle in my direction. Why? Because I can. Because my Autism doesn’t define me; I define Autism. Some days are better than others, just like every other being on the planet facing ups and downs, positives and negatives, smiles and cries. I may struggle to use public transport on some days and avoid it with all my power, on other days the challenge won’t seem as big and I’ll conquer it with my inner strength and determination. I may have a sensory overload one day or manage to stay outdoors for the entirety of it. But with time comes strength. 

Autism isn’t a disability, it’s a different ability.

 A big realization for me has been that everybody with Autism is affected differently. Ie: we all have our strengths and our weaknesses. My obsession is Goats, the obsession begins to take over my every day life and I find it hard to put my energies of focus elsewhere, but I don’t mind at all. I love it and I love Goats! Some may have a profound interest in trains or remembering specific dates. But my interest lies with animals, alongside other enjoyments of dancing and writing. I personally struggle with an inability to change, perfectionism, bright lights, crowded places, certain textures and social anxiety (to name a few…) But everybody is affected differently. 

Following on from my diagnosis, I became doubtful of myself and my abilities. The feeling of numbness became very apparent. I was confused and a little lost in my journey. What did my diagnosis mean for me? Why had nobody detected it sooner? So many questions that still remain unanswered, but now they are seemingly easier to ignore. I began assuming that my new ‘label’ meant I was suddenly different, a shadow of my former self. ‘What ifs’ clouded my mind: What if I couldn’t go to University? What if I couldn’t work with the animals?’ But my reality was, my diagnosis wasn’t stopping me but my thoughts were trying to though.

I hadn’t changed, I had just found out who I really was. This was the becoming.

Two years later, I can happily say that my diagnosis has been nothing but beneficial, though tricky to accept at times. It bothers me at times that I struggle with the ‘smallest’ of things unlike my peers, but I see them as stepping stones to achieving wonderful things. But all in all I wouldn’t change my Autism for The World. My diagnosis is something many people don’t know about me because I don’t ‘seem Autistic’, which again is down to a lack of understanding and knowledge. Nobody looks Autistic the same way nobody looks Depressed, these aren’t adjectives. I take each day in my stride as a means of learning to be proud of who I am. It’s shaped me into the person I wish to become, hardworking and enthusiastic, willing to take on new challenges. Whilst also allowing me to gain a glimpse of the person I always have been, unknowingly.

2 thoughts on “Autism – Discovering the real me two years on

  1. Lots of love to you Laur, you’re amazing 💫💙

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Heids❤️ Lots of love and hugs to you Goat buddy🐐☺️Xxx

      Liked by 1 person

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