Autistic pride day!

18/06/2018 represents Autistic Pride Day.

But what exactly is the day all about?

“Autistic pride day is the celebration of the neurodiversity of people on the autism spectrum. It celebrates what people with autism bring to the community and recognises their potential.”

Pride being a huge component in the way I feel about my diagnosis. Admittedly, I do become frustrated with myself at times for finding “simple things” tough, but there’s nobody in life (Neurotypical or Autistic) who views everything as an easy ride.

We live in a World where anything other than the “norm” is considered “weird” and it’s vastly become something avoidable and scary. People with Autism aren’t weird, what’s weird is the stereotypes and the judgement. What’s weird is that Autistic people can be mistreated due to their disability, no fault of their own. People with disabilities are people too, people with big hearts capable of love and affection. People who shouldn’t be treated any less than the rest.

People deserving of acceptance.

I’m privileged to share my condition with an intelligent, bright and inspirational lady who makes me proud. Who I feel honoured to write about today.

Dr. Temple Grandin is an American Professor, alongside an animal and autism advocate. She is also one of many well recognised people diagnosed with Autism. A kind hearted, compassionate and strong individual. Grandin invented the “hug machine”, designed to assist those on the spectrum with hypersensitivities. Evidently, Autistic people are intelligent, they’re capable of achieving amazing things regardless of what outsiders may assume.

In recent times I’ve seen so much information staggered around online about curing Autism, how people with Autism are evil and how Autism is “caused.” Well, in my opinion, people who view and understand The World from a different and unique perspective aren’t evil, they’re fantastic. People who battle through each day despite personal difficulties aren’t evil, they’re courageous and strong.

But, hey! Guess what? The people making assumptions haven’t bothered to gain an insight into what Autism is and what it can mean for people on the spectrum. Therefore, they aren’t worth getting upset over. Autism isn’t an illness, it’s a lifelong disability present from birth but not always picked up on until later in life. Ie: you can be diagnosed in adulthood and autism doesn’t just magically disappear after childhood.

If Autism isn’t an illness, why would anybody want to cure it?

People aren’t robots. Let’s stop trying to model the “perfect person” and instead, accept people for who they are.

I struggle with many things, including loud noises and social anxiety, changes in routine and so on but my “cure” comes down to hard work and stepping out of my comfort zone. It doesn’t come from over the counter in the chemist, mid-evil research or fad articles written by narrow-minded people.

But people attempting to cure others just for being different, people forcing others to use bleach to cure their condition? They’re evil.

I’m proud of myself for accepting my Autism diagnosis, for allowing it to motivate me to overcome my areas of weakness, for never letting it define me as an individual. Autism is a taboo subject, unfortunately, but Aspies are stronger than the stigma. I’m meeting milestones, making memories and creating beautiful friendships – all of which can be difficult for people on the spectrum, but something I won’t let put a halt to my success.

I’m different and that’s okay. I wouldn’t change my Autism for anything, today, and every day, we can stand up and be proud of who we are, for not allowing our diagnosis to define us in a negative light. For bringing something special into The World.

Autism is amazing. And everybody on the spectrum? They’re amazing too! Autism pride is about accepting people for who they are and encouraging others to find pride in themselves and their abilities.

For more information on Autism, please visit The National Autistic Society.

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