Autism and me – Autism Awareness Month

Autism

It’s Autism Awareness Month throughout the whole duration of April and the second one I’ve proudly celebrated. (Yay!) I’ll regularly be updating my blog throughout the duration of April to share more in relation to Autism Awareness.

I first began blogging about my Autism in 2017, a year after receiving my diagnosis.

Just yesterday, my Tutor told me to take it easy after undergoing Autistic meltdowns and subjecting to my tendencies to give myself too many tasks to handle (oops!) I’m making it my mission to find a balance in life, between working and avoiding falling into a rut of overdoing things.

However I struggle to rest, but I love to write, so here I am!

Prior to receiving my diagnosis, I lacked knowledge on all things Autism, and I certainly had no understanding of an Autism Awareness Month. Heck, I thought I knew what Autism looked like… (I’ll see myself out).

I’m proud of my Autism, I embrace my differences and I’m proud of my passions. I wish for everybody to feel pride in themselves, their accomplishments and the strength of overcoming a bad day. The World needs more love and less judgement, to accept differences instead of attempting to cure them.

Despite everything, and the constant battles I face to accept myself for who I am, I wouldn’t change my animal-loving self, and I most definitely wouldn’t change my Autism. Autism isn’t a disease, why should we wish to cure it?

Everyone has a mountain to climb and autism has not been my mountain, it has been my opportunity for victory.

Throughout the years, my knowledge and understanding on Autism has expanded significantly. I’m aware of not only the difficulties I face on a personal day-to-day basis, but I made it my upmost aim to gain a wider understanding into mutual struggles shared by those on the vast spectrum, because I wanted to help. I found that it’s not only important to accept ourselves, but to accept others, too. Be kind to others, be kind to ourselves.

Though having said that, it’s apparent that no two people on the Autistic spectrum are the same, as often misjudged, and it’s vital that we establish that. The spectrum is large, filled with people of all ages, genders and races. We hold unique interests that hold high levels of importance to us, we communicate and understand things to a different degree and develop at different paces.

None of that is wrong, it’s diverse.

I find that I easily become engrossed in a subject area and devote my energies to that, I love sharing my interests with others, which is why I constantly talk about goats and the reason I’ve been super engaged with my Behavioural Ecology module. I believe that my Autism and my strong passion for animals alongside the bonds I continue to form with them as companions lead to me opting to go down an animal related career path.

Autism awareness is crucial, always. Our conditions don’t magically erase after reaching adulthood. I was diagnosed in my late teens and others have been diagnosed in their 50’s. Aspies face our fair share of challenges and are often misunderstood following the lack of knowledge in specific areas. Ie: sensory overloads and autistic burnouts. Our behaviours have a tendency to be recognised oppositely, our quietness can be seen as rudeness, our politeness can be viewed as evolving attachment issues. We can often become confused by small talk and sarcasm efforts, distressed in busy places and caught up in our favourite activity, but that doesn’t mean we should be overlooked.

It’s hard to adapt in an ever-changing society when change is one of your largest fears.

My Autism diagnosis changed my life, quite literally, for the better. I’ve evolved to an acceptance stage after periods of shame and embarrassment. I love opening up about my Autism, after recognising that I have no reason to be ashamed, looking up to fellow animal lovers including Temple Grandin and the wonderful people I met in my support groups. I’ve learned more about myself and my struggles, and have used them as stepping stones to achieve wonderful milestones. I’ve made friends, I’ve made memories. But most importantly, I’ve grown.

For more information about Autism, please visit The National Autistic Society here:

https://www.autism.org.uk

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